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What I like most, besides actually teaching young people important things, is the variety.

17 Mar

I can’t decide which part of this job I like best, but I know for sure that without Tuesdays and Thursdays, weekends, and the occasional break or professional day, I’d be burnt out exhausted by now. As it is, planning for five different courses (one  being Algebra II, which I am relearning after many years), supposedly standard in essential content but all instruction packed into into two days a week is a real challenge, but mostly I think I’m doing okay. My quieter Tuesdays and Thursdays are broken up by teaching a third grade math/science class on each, and then I tutor a mix of students, mostly in math, for an hour or so.

For a “break,” I get to plan five other classes I teach to middle schoolers on Fridays. Those ones are what is usually called “passion-driven,” with no homework and each, if I want, stand-alone within the topics. Those are hectic but leave me pumped at the end of the day, in an exhausted kind of way, daydreaming of what I could do for the next round of Friday classes. Then I drag myself home for dinner and a hot soak followed by a book or another episode of “Sherlock.”

I actually sort of dread every single class I have to teach. Maybe not dread, but feel the importance of the task and my lack of sufficient preparation, a sense of how much higher I could have aimed. Just beforehand I get psyched, feel pretty useful and engaged in the middle of everything, though rushed, with barely fifty minutes per class. Afterward think, that was okay, with a few really worthwhile moments, and I can’t believe I get paid to do this. Then I plunge back into my stack of grading and try to get a firmer hold on my long term planning, data collection and analysis, and find ways to adapt lessons for various students who need that. Every now and then I realize monthly reports are coming due, or I have an imminent meeting I haven’t glanced at the agenda for, or am supposed to be solving or finding someone to solve technical problems of various kinds, since I agreed to be the school’s tech person. Never a dull moment.

That doesn’t leave much time for a home life, though, but I guess for now it’s okay. My family has been very understanding, and no one is particularly needy right now. A walk around the neighborhood with my husband and our two dogs, a quick date in town for stuffed mushrooms, a fireside chat with my sixteen-year-old daughter or thirteen-year-old son now and then–I guess we’re holding together okay. There’s toilet paper, dishwasher soap and basic groceries in stock, and we all help keep the laundry machines going and help out on garbage day. My husband has stepped in with gusto and professionalism as far as keeping the house clean in my absence and preoccupation, and is taking over some of the banking, school/kid and doctor appointment arrangements, and is building our new fence to boot.

I think Friday classes are my favorite. They remind me of what learning should be, sort of–a teacher hanging out a shingle of what she cares about and can do, and people sign up out of interest (and a bit of wanting to get out of the house and in among peers). Some kids listen and forget and a few couldn’t care less, but most of them are really curious and enjoy finding out and learning to do useful things. A few even take notes without being told to. That feeling of choice and freedom is too rare in schooling situations.

Today, just a half day due to a workshop, the journalism students let me share some quotes from writers and a few interesting youth journalism websites, then finished off their articles and sent them to their editors, one for a publication on The Storm of ’17, one on Donald Trump, One on alien sightings, and one student, an outside-the-box thinking eighth grade girl, single-handedly created a cooly odd little paper oozing with off-the-wall ideas. I had some students review and edit for peers, others do layout, and tried to keep them driving on to the finish and not get caught up in gimmicks and web searches, sort of like a real journalist’s deadline.

Second period we looked at earthquake hazards around the building and how to secure tall furniture. Third period was a nice small group of about eight who worked on hand sewing and embroidery.

After the parent workshop, I worked a few hours more in the quiet classroom tying up a few of the many loose ends educators live with, and got a few more of my files set up. A big drawer each for biology and environmental science, one for all three maths, all ready for next year. The word is, though, that the only courses I’ll teach again will be two of the maths, and I’ll have to take on high school physics, to all ages, since it will only be rotated in every four years. Just so I don’t get too comfortable. I haven’t taken physics since 1983.

 
3 Comments

Posted by on March 17, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

3 responses to “What I like most, besides actually teaching young people important things, is the variety.

  1. jdawgsrunningblog

    March 18, 2017 at 5:48 am

    Are you serious???!!!!!!!!! I am in awe of what you give and what you are able to give–makes me think you could easily start your own school–you have so many skills–along with your insane work ethic–moral compass, intelligence, creativity, awareness and passion. I bow to you and the work you are doing–my wish, for now, is that you be fully appreciated by your peers and students–and community. Also kudos to your family for providing the needed support mechanisms.

     
    • toesinthedirt

      March 18, 2017 at 8:43 pm

      I do feel appreciated, respected, listened to but also kept accountable and of course subject to the laws of supply (teachers that can do the high school math/science side, and demand (thus the rotation of courses and variety).

       
  2. jdawgsrunningblog

    March 19, 2017 at 7:46 am

    good to hear the former–very important in my ‘book’—still in awe–do people really have a full idea of all that you are bringing to (and bring) to the ‘table’?

     

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